Shaggy Parasols RSS

boletes, chanterelles, Lobster Mushroom, lobsters, Puffball Mushrooms, Shaggy Parasols -

Fall is our favorite time of the year here in the Pacific Northwest ... because the weather is nice, the colors great, but mostly because of the mushrooms! They are springing up everywhere. Recent forays have yielded lots of Boletes (Slippery Jacks and Admirables), Golden Chanterelles, Lobsters, Puffballs, and others. This blog shares more about upcoming forays in the Puget Sound, and also a status report on cultured Shaggy Parasols now springing up.

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Shaggy Parasols -

Here at Shortsinwoods, we harvested a huge crop of Shaggy Parasols (Chlorophylum rhacodes) this Fall. These mushrooms dehydrate very easily, and after doing this we found ourselves with about a half dozen gallon-size bags full! These beautiful mushrooms began growing (wild) in our gravel driveway a few years ago, then took up residence in a decaying pile of Bigleaf Maple leaves which I had been using as a repository for the huge Bigleaf Maple tree in our back yard when it dumped its leaves each fall. The caps have a lovely feathery appearance and can be 7" or more in...

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Shaggy Parasols -

After leaving it alone for 24 hours (following my discovery of fruiting Shaggy Parasols in my maple leaf culture in my back yard here at Shortsinwoods yesterday), I returned today to find that the largest shroom which I had left unpicked yesterday, which was somewhat egg-shaped and less than 4 inches in diameter, had blossomed out to a 7" monster cap. You can see it on the left in the photo. The photo also shows the progression of the maturing Shaggies, from parasol-shaped caps about 4 inches in diameter, on the far right, to the one in the center which...

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Shaggy Parasols -

WATCH ACCOMPANYING VIDEOS ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL about cultivating, harvesting & preparing Shaggy Parasols: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLvn-qeHny2A19X__TCsnf0LURNSSjre4G About five years ago, a strange new mushroom popped up in my gravel driveway. It was the shape of an egg, and all the squirrels in my yard went nuts over it. (So to speak.) They were nibbling holes in it, so I could see the inside. But on the outside it was soft, and feathery. The mushroom itself was white, but the tips of the features were brown. And where it was injured, it stained a maroon-ish red. I soon learned it was a...

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